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Trusts and Tax Savings

April 10, 2023

When it comes to taxes, many people are always looking for ways to save money. One of the methods that people often turn to is the creation of a trust. A trust is a legal arrangement in which a person, called the trustee, holds property for the benefit of another person, called the beneficiary. While trusts can be useful for a variety of purposes, such as asset protection and estate planning, the question remains: does a trust actually save you on taxes?

The answer to this question is that it depends on the type of trust you create and the specific tax laws in your jurisdiction. Here are some examples of how a trust can save you on taxes:

1. Revocable Trusts

A revocable trust, also known as a living trust, is a type of trust that can be modified or terminated by the person who created it. Because the creator still has control over the assets in the trust, the trust does not provide any tax benefits. The income generated by the trust is still considered the income of the creator, and is taxed accordingly.

2. Irrevocable Trusts

It’s hard to generalize when it comes to irrevocable trusts as there are so many different options with respect to how they are taxed, and the pros and cons that are associated with each of them. An irrevocable trust in general, as opposed to a revocable living trust, is a type of trust that cannot be modified or terminated without the consent of the beneficiaries. Because the creator of the trust no longer has control over the assets, the trust can provide some tax benefits. For example, if the trust is a non-grantor trust and it generates income, that income is taxed at the trust’s tax rate, which is often lower than an individual’s tax rate. However if the trust is a intentionally defective grantor trust, you may have passed through income at the grantor’s tax rate-which may be a better outcome than a non-grantor trust.

Additionally, assets placed in an irrevocable trust are no longer considered part of the creator’s estate for estate tax purposes. This means that the assets in the trust are not subject to estate taxes when the creator passes away.

3. Charitable Trusts

Charitable trusts are trusts that are created for charitable purposes. There are two types of charitable trusts: charitable remainder trusts and charitable lead trusts. Charitable remainder trusts allow the creator to receive income from the trust for a specified period of time, after which the remaining assets are donated to a charity. Charitable lead trusts, on the other hand, donate income from the trust to a charity for a specified period of time, after which the remaining assets are distributed to the creator’s beneficiaries.

Both types of charitable trusts provide tax benefits. The creator can receive an income tax deduction for the charitable donation, and the assets in the trust are not subject to estate taxes when the creator passes away.

In conclusion, the answer to the question of whether a trust can save you on taxes is yes, but it depends on the type of trust and the specific tax laws in your jurisdiction. If you are considering creating a trust, it is important to consult with a financial or legal professional who can advise you on the best course of action based on your individual circumstances.


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Recent Posts
Is Social Security Going To Run Out In Your Lifetime?

We get regular updates on the Social Security trust fund. In early May, the Social ...

The post Is Social Security Going To Run Out In Your Lifetime? first appeared on Integrated Tax Planning, Legal Planning & Financial Planning.

See more
Thriving on the Uncertainties In Investments

We all like surprises, right? Well not exactly. We like the surprises that we want. ...

The post Thriving on the Uncertainties In Investments first appeared on Integrated Tax Planning, Legal Planning & Financial Planning.

See more
9 Facts About Retirement

Retirement can have many meanings. For some, it will be a time to travel and ...

The post 9 Facts About Retirement first appeared on Integrated Tax Planning, Legal Planning & Financial Planning.

See more